Data entry scams

This article will expose how some popular data entry scams work and how you can avoid being burned by them.

Thousands of people have been ripped off by data entry scams. They hand over good money expecting to enter data for a reputable company, but they almost always end up empty-handed.

Here’s how data entry scams typically work: you visit a website that promises they will pay you to enter data for them. They don’t give you many details of the kind of data you’ll be entering. They just say something like “typing data into a couple of fields”.

So you hand over a registration fee of anywhere from $47 to $97 to access the program and instead of a data entry job they send you an ebook. In the ebook you learn that in order to get paid you have to write ads (and pay for their placement) in the Google AdWords program. If someone clicks on one of your ads and buys a product you get paid a commission. This is called affiliate marketing.

Now I want to make it clear that Google AdWords and affiliate marketing are NOT in themselves a scam. In fact, there are many people who make good money using them. But making money with AdWords takes a lot of work and expertise, and it costs you even more money on top of your “registration fee”.

And this is why data entry scams have such a bad reputation. They get you to hand over your money by misleading you in at least 3 ways:

First, data entry scams do not pay you to enter names or addresses into a database, which is what you expected when you signed up.

Second, they charge you a registration fee to gain access to a list of merchants that have affiliate programs when all of that information can be obtained for free elsewhere.

And third, they hide the fact that you’ll have to pay even more money later in order to place ads on the AdWords network.

Data Entry Scams Targeted

Recently, data entry scams and other shady products have been given the boot by Clickbank, the internet's largest digital marketplace where thousands of the web's most popular products are sold every day.

Clickbank terminated these programs even though data entry scams were some of the most profitable products in their marketplace. Clickbank did not want to be associated with products of a questionable integrity.

So how do I know if I am getting involved in a data entry scam?

My advice is to use caution and to thoroughly investigate any data entry program before forking over any money. Do a Google search on the name of the program followed by the words “scam” or “complaints” and see if anyone has had bad experiences with them.

Also make sure they have a money-back guarantee and pay with your credit card so it will be easier to get your money back if they give you a hard time.

A little common sense can go a long way toward avoiding data entry scams.

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